Shoreland Stewardship

2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount:
$1,000,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount:
$1,220,000
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount:
$1,220,000
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount:
$250,000
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount:
$250,000
Source: 
Clean Water Fund
Status: 
In Progress
Start Date: 
July 2009
Activity Type: 
Education/Outreach/Engagement, Demonstration/Pilot Project, Technical Assistance, Preservation, Restoration/Enhancement
Counties Affected: 
Statewide
Project Details:
2014 Fiscal Year
Legal Citation / Subdivision: 
M.L. 2013, Ch. 137, Art. 2, Sec. 6(f)
Appropriation Language 
$1,000,000 the first year and $1,000,000 the second year are for technical assistance to support local implementation of nonpoint source restoration and protection activities, including water quality protection in forested watersheds.
Fiscal Year Funding Amount: 
$1,000,000
Number of full time equivalents funded: 
7.0
Proposed Measurable Outcome(s) 
In FY14, DNR staff will continue to work with state agency partners and assist local governments on clean water restoration and protection issues. Work will be a continuation of the outcomes stated for FY13.
Project Details:
2013 Fiscal Year
Legal Citation / Subdivision: 
M.L. 2011, First Special Session, Ch. 6, Art. 2, Sec. 6(g)
Appropriation Language 
$1,725,000 the first year and $1,725,000 the second year are for shoreland stewardship, TMDL implementation coordination, providing technical assistance to the Drainage Work Group and Drainage Management Team, and maintaining and updating data. Of this amount, $235,000 each year is for maintaining and updating watershed boundaries and integrating high-resolution digital elevation data with watershed modeling and $40,000 each year is for a biomonitoring database. TMDL implementation coordination efforts shall be focused on major watersheds with TMDL implementation plans, including forested watersheds.
Fiscal Year Funding Amount: 
$1,220,000
Direct expenses: 
$570,678
Administration costs: 
$69,821
Number of full time equivalents funded: 
5.0
Proposed Measurable Outcome(s) 
In FY13, DNR staff will continue to work with state agency partners and assist local governments on clean water restoration and protection issues. Field staff will promote strategies that benefit clean water as well as habitat and other ecosystem values through education, technical help, and partnership. This work will use natural resource information and conservation targeting tools to maximize conservation investments by matching the right strategies in the right places.

DNR will be a partner in building local capacity so that local governments are supported in: better understanding watershed systems; incorporating watershed information and analysis into local water and watershed plans; and targeting, designing, funding, and implementing clean water restoration and protection strategies.

DNR foresters and Soil and Water Conservation Districts will work with landowners in watersheds of sensitive lakes in 7 counties to: write 50 forest stewardship plans totaling 7,000 acres; and distribute $45,000 in cost share funding for private forest management activities. The result will be an increase in land eligible for enrollment in land protection programs and an increase in forest health which is integral to protecting high quality lakes.
Measurable Outcome(s) 
In FY13, DNR staff worked with state agency partners and assisted local governments on clean water restoration and protection issues. DNR brings expertise in hydrology, geomorphology, and biology that enhances local projects so that conservation investments give maximum water quality and ecosystem benefits.

Field staff worked with local governments to strategically target conservation for 58 project ideas that will provide water quality and other ecosystem benefits, and they provided technical assistance with funding, design, or implementation on 127 specific water quality projects. The result is water quality projects that are selected, located and designed for long-term sustainability. For example, DNR consulted with a number of local governments to use a natural channel design approach to stream channel stabilization projects; this type of project lasts longer and provides better habitat benefits than traditional armoring of stream banks. Field staff also worked with 32 communities or groups to build their understanding of watersheds and enhance their capacity through presentations and workshops that were attended by a total of over 1,150 people.

DNR foresters worked with landowners and County Soil and Water Conservation Districts to write 59 forest stewardship plans covering 6,458 acres of forested land in targeted watersheds. This represents an 80% increase in the number of stewardship plans in the targeted watersheds, which drain to sensitive lakes that are home to populations of tulibee, an important fish that requires cold, clean water to survive. The forest stewardship plans will increase eligibility for enrollment in land protection programs and result in an increase in forest health, which is integral to protecting high quality lakes.
Project Details:
2012 Fiscal Year
Legal Citation / Subdivision: 
M.L. 2011, First Special Session, Ch. 6, Art. 2, Sec. 6(g)
Appropriation Language 
$1,725,000 the first year and $1,725,000 the second year are for shoreland stewardship, TMDL implementation coordination, providing technical assistance to the Drainage Work Group and Drainage Management Team, and maintaining and updating data. Of this amount, $235,000 each year is for maintaining and updating watershed boundaries and integrating high-resolution digital elevation data with watershed modeling and $40,000 each year is for a biomonitoring database. TMDL implementation coordination efforts shall be focused on major watersheds with TMDL implementation plans, including forested watersheds.
Fiscal Year Funding Amount: 
$1,220,000
Direct expenses: 
$276,675
Administration costs: 
$176,489
Number of full time equivalents funded: 
9.0
Proposed Measurable Outcome(s) 
In FY 12, DNR will provide assistance to local governments, shoreland and woodland owners on clean water restoration and protection issues.

DNR will expand the number of people working to promote strategies that benefit clean water as well as habitat and other ecosystem values through education, technical help, and partnership. This work will use natural resource information and conservation targeting tools to maximize conservation investments by matching the right strategies in the right places. DNR will help local governments design, get funding, and implement clean water strategies.

DNR Foresters will work with property owners in priority areas within the central lakes region to write stewardship plans and promote enrollment in land protection programs.
Measurable Outcome(s) 
In FY12, DNR staff worked with state agency partners and assisted local governments on clean water restoration and protection issues. DNR brings expertise in hydrology, geomorphology, and biology that enhances local projects so that conservation investments give maximum water quality and ecosystem benefits.

Field staff worked with 18 local governments on strategically targeting conservation work for water quality and other ecosystem benefits, and provided technical assistance with funding, design, or implementation on 48 individual water quality projects. The result is water quality projects that are selected, located and designed for long-term sustainability. For example, DNR consulted with a number of local governments to use a natural channel design approach to stream channel stabilization projects, this type of project lasts longer and provides better habitat benefits than traditional armoring of stream banks.

Field staff also worked with 24 communities or groups to build their understanding of watersheds and enhance their capacity through presentations and workshops that were attended by a total of over 850 people.
Project Details:
2011 Fiscal Year
Legal Citation / Subdivision: 
M.L. 2009, Ch. 172, Art. 2, Sec. 5(g)
Appropriation Language 
$250,000 the first year and $250,000 the second year are for nonpoint source restoration and protection activities.
Fiscal Year Funding Amount: 
$250,000
Proposed Measurable Outcome(s) 
In FY11, DNR hydrologists will continue the workshops and implementation projects started in the south and east parts of the state in FY10. Fisheries staff in southwestern Minnesota will partner with the Blue Earth Soil and Water Conservation District and to promote aquatic habitat conservation practices with local landowners. DNR will also adapt the CD-Rom "Restore Your Shore" into a new interactive website to make this useful information accessible to a broader audience.
Measurable Outcome(s) 
In FY11, hydrologists and fisheries staff worked with local governments and property owners on clean water restoration and protection issues in the south and east parts of the state:

*Presented clean water strategies information at 9 workshops, tours, and other events, including 6 "Our Water, Our Choices" workshops led by DNR and attended by 93 people, including local officials.

*Participated in St. Croix MIDS (Minimal Impact Design Standards) pilot steering committee. This project will help cities establish policies and programs that will give them a path to compliance with, and a method for calculating credits for, certain state stormwater requirements.

*Assisted with funding coordination, design, or installation of 10 restoration projects, including 4 river restoration projects, 2 raingardens, one wetland restoration, two native prairies, and a high velocity fish barrier.

*Adapted the CD-Rom "Restore Your Shore" to an internet-based application that allows users to interactively explore ways that shoreline property owners can create, enhance, or protect healthy shorelines for habitat and clean water. The website includes step by step instructions for shoreland restoration and an online interactive plant selection tool.

* Worked with local governments to provide information, guidance, and technical assistance to landowners regarding conservation assistance, easements and conservation projects. This work resulted in permanently protecting 348.8 acres of riparian land and floodplains through conservation easements.
Project Details:
2010 Fiscal Year
Legal Citation / Subdivision: 
M.L. 2009, Ch. 172, Art. 2, Sec. 5(g)
Appropriation Language 
$250,000 the first year and $250,000 the second year are for nonpoint source restoration and protection activities.
Fiscal Year Funding Amount: 
$250,000
Proposed Measurable Outcome(s) 
In FY10, DNR will provide assistance to local governments and shoreland owners on clean water restoration and protection issues. This work will be done primarily in two areas of the state. In the south, DNR a hydrologist will lead the development and presentation of a workshop series, "Our Water, Our Choices" for citizens and local officials, and work with local groups on clean water projects. In the St. Croix Basin, a hydrologist will work partners and local communities to promote and implemement best management practices for clean water.
Measurable Outcome(s) 
In FY10, DNR hydrologists provided assistance to local governments and shoreland owners on clean water restoration and protection issues:

* Presented clean water strategies information at 22 workshops, tours, and other events, including 10 "Our Water, Our Choices" workshops led by DNR and attended by 257 people, including local officials.

* Worked with partners to design and install 3 raingardens to capture runoff and prevent downstream pollution.

*Provided technical assistance and input to local partners on clean water strategies including agricultural best management practices and municipal stormwater infrastructure.

* Worked with Crow Organization of Waters on two river restorations near Forest City and Hutchinson.

* Coordinated and executed the High Island Lake drawdown in Sibley County with a collaborative of lake association, local, and federal partners.

* Restored two lakeshore lots on Lake Jennie as part of a hands-on shoreline restoration workshop.

* Developed and distributed informational materials about shorelines, raingardens, and agricultural best management practices.

Project Overview

This project works with local governments, shoreline property owners, farmers, conservation groups, and other partners to provide learning opportunities, technical help, and financial assistance that results in cleaner water through healthier shorelands and watersheds. DNR staff, with multiple partners, host workshops titled "Our Water, Our Choices," "Get More from Your Shore," and "NEMO - Nonpoint Education for Municipal Officials'" that increase understanding of the connection between land and water among local officials (county board, city council, board of adjustment, planning commission, etc.) and property owners (especially shoreline property owners and agricultural producers). The workshops highlight strategies for minimizing impacts of human land use on lakes, streams, and wetlands. They also provide hands on assistance with shoreline and streambank restoration projects. This project also produces new outreach materials and promotes existing DNR shoreland tools such as "Restore Your Shore" (interactive CD rom) and "Lakescaping for Wildlife and Water Quality" (book).

About the Issue

Healthy shorelands and watersheds are critical for healthy lakes. The shoreland - the area where the land meets the water - is home to the majority of plants and animals in the lake ecosystem. Trees, shrubs, and deep-rooted native grasses and wildflowers prevent erosion of the shoreline and trap dirt, excess phosphorus, and other pollution from entering the lake. However, many of our shoreland ecosystems have been severely degraded by replacement of native vegetation with turf grass or crops. These land uses, both on the shoreline and in the watershed (the area of land that drains to the water body) strongly influence the health of our lakes, streams and wetlands. By working with people that make or influence decisions about how the land is treated, we provide learning opportunities and technical help for restoration and protection of shorelands and watersheds.

Project Manager

Julie
Westerlund
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul
55155
651-259-5147